Nov. 16: Work In Progress: A Forum for the Exchange of Ideas

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Nov. 10-11: Directions of the Decolonial Turn with Walter Mignolo and Nelson Maldonado-Torres

The Center for Interdisciplinary Studies in Philosophy, Interpretation, and Culture (CPIC) at Binghamton University is officially closing its doors this year. As a formal closure, we invite you to join our public event on Nov. 10th and 11th for a convivial and passionate discussion. The event is called “Directions of the Decolonial Turn”. We invite two influential thinkers in the field of decolonial studies to give a public talk and a seminar – Prof. Walter Mignolo from Duke University and Prof. Nelson Maldonado-Torres from Rutgers University. Along with the two speakers and Prof. Maria Lugones, the director of CPIC, we look forward to exchanging the different understandings, experiences, and future outlooks with all the participants. Your thought is of crucial importance to us. We see this event as an opportunity to build our coalitional politics and exercise our decolonial love.

At a time of diversity and dispersion of uses of the term “decolonial”, what are the direction(s) and pragmatics of coloniality/(de)coloniality as a non-unified intellectual political movement that calls for an epistemological turn away from the dehumanization of people of color by those whom Maldonado Torres calls “normal subjects”? Where does the decolonial politics go? What are the “yes” and “no” of the decolonial? How is the epistemic decolonial turn opening the way for the rise of epistemologies from the Global South, and bringing in new interpretations of the human experiences? How do we dwell into the central concepts that express this epistemic politics, such as “the communal”? These are some questions we would like to think together.

[Public Talk and Discussion]
Date: Friday, Nov. 10th
Time: 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Room: Binghamton University Art Museum (Fine Arts Building, FA 213)

[Seminar]
Date: Saturday, Nov. 11th
Time: 11:00 am -2:00 pm
Room: English Conference Room (Library Tower, LT 2401)

April 26: IASH Fellows’ Speaker Series presents Anastasiya Lyubas (Comp Lit)

Join us Wednesday March 15 at 12pm New date/time forthcoming! in the IASH Conference Room (LN 1106, next to the LT elevators) for Anastasiya Lyubas’ talk, “Language, Plasticity and Modernism in Debora Vogel’s Poetics.” Abstract: This paper examines the poetics of Debora Vogel, a Yiddish Modernist writer, philosopher, art critic and translator. Vogel’s singular style finds […]

Join us Wednesday April 26th at noon in the IASH Conference Room (LN 1106, next to the LT elevators) for Anastasiya Lyubas’ talk, “Language, Plasticity and Modernism in Debora Vogel’s Poetics.”

Abstract: This paper examines the poetics of Debora Vogel, a Yiddish Modernist writer, philosopher, art critic and translator. Vogel’s singular style finds itself at the intersection of philosophy, literature, visual and plastic arts. Vogel utilizes the strict economy and iterability of linguistic signs to foreground the materiality of language. She deploys what she calls “white/grey words” that express monotony, banality and stasis, as well as other stylistic devices to create a “plastic” idiom. This idiom gives and receives form, and presents the creative work not only as a result but also as a process.

(POSTPONED due to snow): IASH Fellows’ Speaker Series presents Anastasiya Lyubas (Comp Lit)

Join us Wednesday March 15 at 12pm New date/time forthcoming! in the IASH Conference Room (LN 1106, next to the LT elevators) for Anastasiya Lyubas’ talk, “Language, Plasticity and Modernism in Debora Vogel’s Poetics.”

Abstract: This paper examines the poetics of Debora Vogel, a Yiddish Modernist writer, philosopher, art critic and translator. Vogel’s singular style finds itself at the intersection of philosophy, literature, visual and plastic arts. Vogel utilizes the strict economy and iterability of linguistic signs to foreground the materiality of language. She deploys what she calls “white/grey words” that express monotony, banality and stasis, as well as other stylistic devices to create a “plastic” idiom. This idiom gives and receives form, and presents the creative work not only as a result but also as a process.

March 1: IASH Fellows’ Speaker Series presents Giovanna Montenegro (Comp Lit and Romance Languages)

Join us Wednesday March 1 at 12pm in the IASH Conference Room (LN 1106, next to the LT elevators) for Giovanna Montenegro’s talk “German Bankers and the Conquest of Venezuela: Cultural Memory of ‘Heretic’ Capital and Colonization.”

Abstract: I seek to decipher fictional and historical texts that recreate the sixteenth-century German conquest of Venezuela by the Welsers, bankers from Augsburg. In particular, I analyze the cultural memory of the Welser period from a German perspective.  In the German Imperial era and the early twentieth-century we see a proliferation of publications that manifest desire for lost colony (ies). “Venezuela” became a symbol for Germany’s enduring colonial desires, though this time the colonial utopia would take place in Africa. In the twentieth century, historians and novelists writing within Nationalist Socialism in Germany from 1938 to 1944 interpret the Welser period in a manner that further builds the image of the Aryan conquistador planting the seed of German nationhood on the American continent. The main subject is not the failure of the Welser colony; rather it is the honor of the German people and the myth of the grandness of the German nation that prevails.

Feb 28: Dean’s Speaker Series in New Directions in Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies presents Timothy Murray

Join us Tuesday February 28 12-1pm in LN2200 (Dean’s Conference Room)

Sponsored by the Dean’s Speaker Series and the Comparative Literature department

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